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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 7:38 pm 
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And so does another word frequently heard when the subject of facing shanks comes up, but I won't say that one. :lol:

I thought I'd post this for its sheer WTF factor, as well as an example of the sort of thing which makes for so few pipe repairmen in the world.

The pipe is a legit giant. Weighs six ounces. The shank is 1.3" across at its widest point, meaning 35mm rod had to be used.

The problem? The guy who made it, for reasons unknown, dished the face of the shank by hand instead of properly flattening it. I've seen the "dish cheat" done from time to time on round shanks (it makes it easier to get a light-tight gap), but that isn't what this was. The damn thing was "C"-shaped when viewed from one of its flat sides, like a claw: there was a full millimeter gap between the stem and shank face on one side when the rod touched the outer points, and about 3/4ths that much gap on the other.

In case you're wondering, yes, the original stem had been relieved at the touch-points to achieve something approaching a fit. (Still a shitty fit by 2015 standards, but definitely better than it would have been otherwise.)

So... the pin gauge / lathe spin trick wasn't possible because of the pipe's size & weight together with the thin walls of the mortise on two sides.

The tenon plug-in sanding disk widget I made years ago was too small (1" diameter.)

Dragging the end of the shank across a taped-down sheet of 800 grit wasn't possible either, because of the size & weight. That technique requires CONTROL, and even Sas's hands probably aren't big enough to make this stummel his bitch.

My only way out? Improvise a padded ledge on the table of a disc sander, get situated, do a couple dry runs, hit the AC, and eyeball it. No safety net, no rewind button. :shock:

No biggie, of course, the pipe is only worth a few grand. Easily one of, if not THE, best-grained giant pipes in the world. :lol:

How did it go? Light tight perfect fit on the first stab. 8)

2016 is starting off right, for sure. :D :D :D


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"Not once has a customer looked at one of my pipes and said, 'I like this pipe, but wish you had made the stem an hour faster'... I want every stem to be perfect" --- Adam Davidson


Last edited by LatakiaLover on Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:18 pm 
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Dear George,

get a lathe. This shit's pretty easy.


Hope this helps

Todd

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 07, 2016 10:56 pm 
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Sasquatch wrote:
get a lathe. This shit's pretty easy.



You would not want to spin this thing. It's a war club with an asymmetrically thin-walled shank.

(I'm sure there's a game theory term for perfect solutions that risk 100% loss vs. good solutions that are semi-recoverable. When it's someone else's property you NEVER choose #1)

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"Not once has a customer looked at one of my pipes and said, 'I like this pipe, but wish you had made the stem an hour faster'... I want every stem to be perfect" --- Adam Davidson


Last edited by LatakiaLover on Wed Jan 27, 2016 9:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 3:39 am 
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Cool stuff!
Have you considered combining chucking&spinning and sandpaper lapping methods- like chucking the pipe in the lathe and just spinning it very slowly by hand while feeding something abrasive from the toolpost?
Your job sucks man, I would have cursed to the point the neighbors would call the cops if I had to do a job like this ;)

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 5:43 am 
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show off!

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 6:30 am 
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W.Pastuch wrote:

Have you considered combining chucking&spinning and sandpaper lapping methods- like chucking the pipe in the lathe and just spinning it very slowly by hand while feeding something abrasive from the toolpost?


Actually, I completely forgot about being able to turn lathes by hand. Might take two people to get it to work, but worth trying. Thanks! :D

In this particular case the flattened profile of the shank might be a problem at any speed because of the on again / off again contact of tool and wood, but also worth a try.


Quote:
Your job sucks man, I would have cursed to the point the neighbors would call the cops if I had to do a job like this ;)


Believe it or not this sort of stuff is the fun part. The shop equivalent of wing suit flying or BASE jumping. It's doing the same things over and over, assembly line style, that drives me nuts.

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"Not once has a customer looked at one of my pipes and said, 'I like this pipe, but wish you had made the stem an hour faster'... I want every stem to be perfect" --- Adam Davidson


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 6:53 am 
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I didn't mean the risk/difficulty factor, I meant the fixing someone else's fuck ups part ;)

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 11:24 am 
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I was mostly just fuckin around with my post, but there's some truth to it... My lathe is variable speed and I've had it at 8 rpm, and that's so slow it's hardly moving. A pin gauge and some sandpaper on a stick...

I hear you though George - you are not in a position to risk having something fly across the room and take damage, and that has to be your #1 priority, and if it adds 10 minutes or an hour to the job, that's just the way it's gonna be.

I just let stuff fly, and call it "art" if there's a big dent in the side.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:12 pm 
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W.Pastuch wrote:
I didn't mean the risk/difficulty factor, I meant the fixing someone else's fuck ups part ;)


I get revved up by design/execution idiocy on everything from consumer products to parking lot layouts, but don't when it comes to pipes because without THAT I wouldn't have as much work. :lol:

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"Not once has a customer looked at one of my pipes and said, 'I like this pipe, but wish you had made the stem an hour faster'... I want every stem to be perfect" --- Adam Davidson


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 12:15 pm 
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LOL parking lot layouts are a bug-bear for me too. :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 1:56 pm 
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I solved the problem of things bouncing off the walls. I padded them.Then put in a steel door, padded, of course. The only problem is my wife only lets me out at night.lol!
George I love seeing your solutions to fixing the situation. I would be crazier as pipe repairman.Have a great year!!!


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PostPosted: Fri Jan 08, 2016 2:47 pm 
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Good job that you did that with one swipe- I would like to be so skilled.
Your method renders the following irrelevant, but others may see some benefit, especially if your method doesn't work out quickly.
Is this the type of home made device ("tenon plug sanding disc widget") you have for facing?
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I made the pilot out of ebonite but am thinking of using Delrin on the next. Any diameter cylinder can be turned of suitable wood (oak dowel above) depending on your needs. I turn it by hand. That is 150 grit paper secured by CA.When I want a finer grit of paper, I heat the paper with a heat gun and it peels off, I can then go to a finer grit. This requires a good clean mortise for the pilot, something that I am still working on.
I also use the cut-the-shine method- cut a stem or rod to fit, then rotate it forcefully against the shank face. this will leave shiny areas at the point(s) of contact. Using a very sharp knife, carefully cut away the shiny area(s). I enhance the marking by putting some magic marker on the stem face. I can follow up with the sander above to make a smooth face.
This process can take an hour or more and I can see why a production oriented operator would look for a less time consuming method, but this works for my present experimental pace.
DocAitch

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