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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:08 pm 
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I'm working on a little tomato that round right up to the chamber. I want to put a bevel around the chamber rim. Normally I would do that with files and sandpaper, but I thought maybe I could cut it on the lathe using a jam chuck in the chamber, like using a really big pin gauge... (I don't have pins that big.) Anyone ever do that? Seems doable, but I wanted to tap into the hive mind before I tried it.

thanks!
Jeremy.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:23 pm 
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Easier, faster, and safer --- take a baseball-ish sized ball with a wide strip of sandpaper pinched tightly across it in one hand, the pipe bowl in the other, and press/twist them together. It's self-centering (if you pay attention), and you can climb grades to a finished "cut" that requires no further work in a few minutes.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 4:48 pm 
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LatakiaLover wrote:
Easier, faster, and safer --- take a baseball-ish sized ball with a wide strip of sandpaper pinched tightly across it in one hand, the pipe bowl in the other, and press/twist them together. It's self-centering (if you pay attention), and you can climb grades to a finished "cut" that requires no further work in a few minutes.

I like the sound of that! Thanks, George!
Also, I thought out that my plan only "works" if the axis of the chamber is perpendicular to the rim..... otherwise, the bevel goes very irregular.
Thanks for the tip!

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 13, 2017 10:52 pm 
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seamonster wrote:
I'm working on a little tomato that round right up to the chamber. I want to put a bevel around the chamber rim. Normally I would do that with files and sandpaper, but I thought maybe I could cut it on the lathe using a jam chuck in the chamber, like using a really big pin gauge... (I don't have pins that big.) Anyone ever do that? Seems doable, but I wanted to tap into the hive mind before I tried it.

thanks!
Jeremy.

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You are absolutely nuts Jeremy!

Dremel it for roughing out then come in by hand with sandpaper. Convex surface is easier to finish than concave.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am 
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PremalChheda wrote:

You are absolutely nuts Jeremy!

Dremel it for roughing out then come in by hand with sandpaper. Convex surface is easier to finish than concave.



Thanks, Premal.

I'm going to have to go this route. I tried George's advice with a billiard ball I had laying around, but it made too flat of a bevel,
I'd need a smaller diameter ball. So, dremel and sandpaper it is.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 7:54 am 
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I've done it both George's and Premal's way. They both give different effects. I've also used a jam chuck in the tobacco chamber but it's a lot of work with limited results.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 14, 2017 5:09 pm 
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Just use your thumb and some 220. Fast and easy.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 17, 2017 2:57 pm 
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220 is too slow, Tyler! I go 100.
:wink:

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 18, 2017 7:36 pm 
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Charl wrote:
220 is too slow, Tyler! I go 100.
:wink:


100 seems to be to low for good control. Lowest I ever use now is 120, but 220 seems to do the job most of the time.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 19, 2017 10:54 am 
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For what it's worth, I use a jamb chuck a few times a year to reshape the bowl of a pipe or cut a bevel on the rim after the fact. It's really not that hard and doesn't take that much time. Just start with an oversized poplar dowel and turn it to your desired diameter (poplar, as it is softer than the briar and will compress giving you a good fit without marring the briar.). Take really light cuts and you should be good. I use the Easy Wood Tools diamond cutter for the rim. If you are super concerned about the pipe flying off the lathe glue a piece of scrap to the bottom of the pipe and bring your tailstock up.

Like you mentioned, the chamber has the be perpendicular to the rim or it won't work. I am simple minded, so all of my pipes are :-)

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:34 pm 
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I'm no master or genius but, I've used the ball method and didn't really care for the concave bevel it produced so I just cut it on the lathe at about 45 degrees with a boring bar because it's smaller in circumference, right after I drill the chamber. I don't understand this Jamb Chuck thing. Why would you want to invert the bowl onto a chuck and then try to bevel it? Maybe there's something I'm missing, it's been known to happen.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:38 pm 
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I use the jamb chuck to correct or refine the bowl top after I have the pipe off the lathe and mostly shaped. Using a jamb chuck is a quick and easy way to remount the pipe, after it is shaped, and accurately cut the rim to shape and have it be perpendicular to the chamber

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:52 pm 
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scotties22 wrote:
I use the jamb chuck to correct or refine the bowl top after I have the pipe off the lathe and mostly shaped. Using a jamb chuck is a quick and easy way to remount the pipe, after it is shaped, and accurately cut the rim to shape and have it be perpendicular to the chamber


Okay, that's what I don't understand. Why bevel the bowl after shaping when it can be done while it's still on the lathe?
Maybe I plan ahead more than others, I do know once I take it off the lathe I don't want to put it back on for anything.
Now I doubt if this matters but, maybe it does, I use a metal lathe and do as much shaping as I can on it.
Once it leaves it's all wheel and hand.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:15 pm 
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Every once in a while I don't like how I shaped the rim while the pipe was on the lathe. And every once in a while I screw up my shaping and need to reshape the top of the bowl. Since I don't have pin guages that are big enough I get a dowel and make a jamb chuck.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:26 pm 
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scotties22 wrote:
Every once in a while I don't like how I shaped the rim while the pipe was on the lathe. And every once in a while I screw up my shaping and need to reshape the top of the bowl. Since I don't have pin guages that are big enough I get a dowel and make a jamb chuck.


Okay! If I screw it up I just fix it with hand sanding, maybe a lot more work for some but, I always get it where I want it and don't have to worry about screwing it up twice on a machine. Of course all my pipes are turds to start out with so there's little to worry about anyway.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:58 pm 
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My original question was about a stummel that was shaped first, drilled second. It was never checked up.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:00 pm 
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Yeah, if you can get your hands on pin gauges big enough, that is ideal, but not everyone has them. I did recently use one to redefine the ring on a rhodesian after blasting away a bit too much while at briar lab, because Nate has every size pin gauge you could possibly want. Worked like a charm. I have used dowels in my own shop though. They work well too.

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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2017 11:05 pm 
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seamonster wrote:
My original question was about a stummel that was shaped first, drilled second. It was never checked up.

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That certainly explains it all sir, I reckon I missed that part, A.D.D. in action.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:50 am 
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Thanks for the information guys..

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 06, 2017 7:24 pm 
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I use wood balls size of a golf ball and larger. Start at 100 and work up. Keep it simple!!


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