pipemakersforum.com

The original forum for pipe makers on the web
It is currently Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:19 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Pipes 9, 10, & 11
PostPosted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 11:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:05 pm
Posts: 2602
Here's my latest work. I'd love to hear your honest thoughts and opinions.

Pipe #9:
This one was supposed to be a chubby billiard nosewarmer, but a large pit developed about 2/3 of the way up the bowl that went all the way through to the chamber. I decided I still had enough briar to shape a Rhodesian or bulldog out of it. The airway is a few mm off center and the chamber was drilled at 1" for the original intended shape. A bit wide for a Rhodesian or bulldog I think. I also found out that a Rhodesian or bulldog shape without a lathe is extremely difficult. The shape looks more like an apple with the Rhodesian ring so I affectionately dubbed it the "Rhode-apple" shape. I think it wasn't a total disaster and thought, with the wide chamber, it might be good for Va/Per's so I gifted it to a forum member who had sent me a generous amount of tobacco.

Image


Pipe #10:
Image

Image


Pipe #11:

Image

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 1:36 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jun 20, 2008 11:09 am
Posts: 30
I love 11 so much


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 4:21 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jan 07, 2008 3:03 pm
Posts: 1838
Location: South Africa
9 is good, 10 is my type of my pipe and 11 is absolutely stunning! 11 is the type of pipe that will draw my attention inbetween a 100 pipes.

Well done!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 6:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jun 26, 2008 5:03 pm
Posts: 223
Location: pennsylvania USA
Very nice work. Number 11 is sweet.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 8:33 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 23, 2006 8:00 pm
Posts: 5132
Location: United States/Rhode Island
Hey, some work to critique!!!

First the Rhode-apple. Personally, this is my favorite of the bunch. I don't have any real comments on teh pipe itself, but more on your own comments. Rhodesians are typically of robust proportions, and having a nice substantial bowl on a good thick shank like that makes it all work as a unit. Personally, I've seen both the flat angled bowl top, and the more rounded bowl top on rhodesians, and I must say I prefer the rounder tops like yours. To me, this is a well executed pipe with good form and proportion. The button may need a minor amount of work, but it's tough to tell from only one photo.

#10 / Lovat: This one caught my eye at first. A lovat is a very tough shape to do right because of that loooong shank. If it's at all off angle, or has any variance in thickness, it goes from being a nice pipe to a unsettling pipe in fairly short order. I don't see either of those common problems evident here. Personally, I would have made the shank a hair thicker, or the bowl a hair lighter. The bowl seems a little large for the shank size. The saddle area on the stem seems like it could use some slimming as well - though that is tough to say for certain from these photos. It almost looks like a lazy transition, and should be more abrupt and less rounded - keep the face vertical, then give it a quarter round transition right at the flat of the stem. This is a tough thing to do by hand, but don't get me wrong - I think only another pipe maker might notice this on your pipe. Overall, a good execution.

#11 / freehand: This shape of pipe isn't my cup of tea, but I'll keep my comments objective. The stem starts off at the shank pretty well. I like that it's more of an extension of the shank there adding balance and proportion. If the stem was thin all the way up to the wood, it would be completely out of balance. As it is, the stem may still be a little long, but not overly so. Speaking of the stem, I think you've got too much bend in it. Personally, I wouldn't have bent it that far. Most pipes actually work best with slightly less than a perfectly perpendicular bend in relation to the bowl - especially longer pipes that are designed to be held rather than clenched. The stem/shank transition area could use a little improvement. It's not easy to tell if that line is due to an actual gap, or if it's that the stem isn't the same size as the shank. Overall it looks good. The shank/bowl transition looks good on this, and all the pipes you posted.

Nice work!

_________________
Kurt Huhn
AKA: Oversized Ostrogoth
pipecrafter@pipecrafter.com
http://www.pipecrafter.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2008 9:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:05 pm
Posts: 2602
Thanks for the input fellas. Thanks especially to Kurt. Very constructive criticism all of which confirms my own thoughts on these pipes and a couple things I didn't pick up on but agree with. As for the button work, any advice on how to keep crisp lines while doing final sanding and buffing? I'm having the same trouble with my saddles. I'd like to keep a nice crisp edge on my saddles but am not sure how to avoid losing it during buffing. The saddle stem is definitely tough to get just right by hand. I believe this one is my third attempt at a saddle stem and hope that I can improve with more practice.

Thanks again,
Wayne Teipen


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:43 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 1:05 pm
Posts: 2602
Just bumping this one to see if anyone has any advice regarding my last post.

Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 9:46 am 
Offline
Site Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 23, 2006 8:00 pm
Posts: 5132
Location: United States/Rhode Island
Practice, practice, practice. Saddles, when done right, are some of the best looking stems in my opinion. If you mess them up, though, they look like crap. I think the best advice for saddles is to use the old chainsaw file. Make a relatively perpendicular transition and file the transition area between the flat and the perpendicular area with the chainsaw file. This will give a crisp transition that looks great. Also try not to round over the top as well. You want abrupt angle changes, not smooth transitions.

Reading that over, I don't think it's quite as clear as I intended. I'll try to draw some pics later on.

_________________
Kurt Huhn
AKA: Oversized Ostrogoth
pipecrafter@pipecrafter.com
http://www.pipecrafter.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 3:00 pm 
Offline
Site Supporter
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 26, 2007 6:48 pm
Posts: 786
Location: Los Angeles
In order to keep crisp edges on your stem when buffing, you need to keep your edges at a tangent to the wheel. Never allow a crisp edge to "gouge" into the wheel. It's hard to explain... say you're trying to buff the flat on a saddle and want to keep that crisp saddle edge: imagine trying to buff the stem from the middle of the flat to the edge that is pointing down, so apply pressure to the middle of the flat against the wheel and adjust your angle slightly to buff to the edge, but not so much as to gouge. Then flip the stem sideways in your hand to buff from the middle to the other edge, again pointing down. You want to wheel to "fall off" the edge, never gouge or introduce an edge into the wheel. When it comes time to buff that little edge to the flats, hold the stem parallel with the wheel and lightly run the full length of the edge along the center of the wheel. That way, the edge never has a chance to "catch" and you are buffing that flat edge flat. I hope this made some sense.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group