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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:58 am 
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Here's my first attempt at the bulldog shape. I'm still freehanding the rings so they are a bit sloppy. I just purchased an old lathe yesterday. I still need to get a proper head and tailstock but hope to be using it soon. These pics aren't the greatest but let me know what you think from what you can see.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 2:24 pm 
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For a first bulldog it looks pretty darn good to me. Try to get the square shank/stem edges as sharp as possible.

I think it was Kurt who mentioned this for cutting the rings: Grind the short leg of a small old Allen wrench to the ring thickness/width you desire on your bulldog. If using a wood lathe, you have to make a handle for it. If using a metal lathe, clamp it in your tool holder. Use this to turn the rings.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 3:05 pm 
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I had the edges pretty sharp but lost them when buffing. I'm guessing I'm not buffing correctly. Any advice/tips?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 3:33 pm 
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I recently posted an answer to something similar that I'll just copy and paste in here. Other pipe makers may have other tricks or a better way of explaining it.

Quote:
In order to keep crisp edges on your stem when buffing, you need to keep your edges at a tangent to the wheel. Never allow a crisp edge to "gouge" into the wheel. It's hard to explain... say you're trying to buff the flat on a saddle and want to keep that crisp saddle edge: imagine trying to buff the stem from the middle of the flat to the edge that is pointing down, so apply pressure to the middle of the flat against the wheel and adjust your angle slightly to buff to the edge, but not so much as to gouge. Then flip the stem sideways in your hand to buff from the middle to the other edge, again pointing down. You want to wheel to "fall off" the edge, never gouge or introduce an edge into the wheel. When it comes time to buff that little edge to the flats, hold the stem parallel with the wheel and lightly run the full length of the edge along the center of the wheel. That way, the edge never has a chance to "catch" and you are buffing that flat edge flat. I hope this made some sense.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:31 pm 
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kbadkar wrote:
I recently posted an answer to something similar that I'll just copy and paste in here. Other pipe makers may have other tricks or a better way of explaining it.


A picture is worth lots-o-words

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 6:11 pm 
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Ah, that makes sense.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2008 6:16 pm 
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i think that's a fine looking pipe. i love the white stem with it. i'd say for freehanding the rings, they look pretty sharp. obviously the lathe will improve them. nice job.


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 Post subject: She's a beaut
PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2008 9:06 am 
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I love the bulldog shape and this one is a beauty.

Nice job!

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2008 8:59 pm 
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I think it might look better if it had a larger outside diameter and a sharper more acute angle between the top and sides. I didn't like the white stem at first, but the more I look, the more I like. The shank and stem seems very square with nice straight lines It must have been very difficult to create the lines around the stummel without a lathe, how did you do it? Nice pipe!


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2008 10:38 pm 
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I wouldn't have chosen the white stem myself. This one was a commissioned pipe. But now that it's done it's growing on me. I think the white stem would look even better on a rusticated pipe with an ebony stain. I first tried to do the rings with a hobby knife until I stuck it into my finger. I quickly gave that up and used a thin cutting disc in my dremel. Not ideal but what do you do without proper tools? Ya gotta improvise. It definitely shows in the quality of the work though.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 12:26 pm 
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Nice one, Wayne, and you've definitely given me an inspiration.

The folks who make Absylux also make a "natural" version that's kindof an off-white, beige color. I've seen pictures of it, but I can't seem to pull any up at the moment.

I have been tempted to order some to use for decorative rings, but now the idea of a whole stem out of the natural ABS seems appealing.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 04, 2008 3:40 am 
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it´s a very nice first try, Really! The only thing i have to say is that the rings is supposed to mark the thickest point of the bowl. Yours is just above but for first try it´s great :)

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